THE BITESITE BLOG
Timclark

Thank you, Tim Clark

business company film

When I started BiteSite, I do what I always do when I start any project: I start to have grand visions of what the future would look like. I pictured a huge office with awesome furniture and gear, lots of employees, filming on big locations, and coding some of the best apps in the world. Now while some aspects of that have come true, we’re still a small startup with lots to achieve.

While we have hit some milestones we set out to hit, we still haven’t achieved others. For example, I pictured by now that we’d be in our own office or that we’d be shooting on RED cameras. But as time goes by, I start to realize more and more what’s truly important and I’ve learnt that the most important milestone we’ve hit is building the team and the most important resource we have is our people. I know it’s a cliche, but it’s completely true.

I’ve come to the realization that if we had to cut back on our rent or our film gear or the computers we use or the services we pay for - we’d figure it out. But if I lost my team and it was back to just me - that would be a lot harder to swallow. That’s why I feel it very important to talk about the amazing people that make up BiteSite.

Usually articles, blog posts, and news items center around people starting at BiteSite or moving on to their next opportunity which causes a lack of celebration for the people who do an amazing job day in and day out and stay with the team. So with that, today, I’d like to celebrate Tim Clark.

The other day I opened up LinkedIn on my phone and this came up

3 years at BiteSite makes Tim one of our longest-running employees and is definitely the most senior employee that’s still with us today.

Tim started out when I needed a motion graphic designer. I realized that my motion graphic skills were quite limited and I needed someone who could pull off some of the requests we were getting. So I put out a job posting for a motion graphic designer who could also be an all around filmmaker. I had a couple of great applicants, but Tim last minute submitted a video application. I was already impressed the effort he put in, but then was even happier to see he had the skills we needed. Today, Tim is a all around filmmaker handling everything from location scouts, to shooting, to lighting, to sound mixing, to editing, to colour grading, to motion graphics, and more.

I hired Tim based on our initial interviews because of his attitude and skill set. But it’s what I have observed over the past 3 years that really makes Tim stand out above the rest.

In corporate video, or any video work for that matter, your work can be incredibly unpredictable. You may show up to a shoot that you planned for 3 hours and end up staying for 6. You may show up to a shoot at 9am and not leave until midnight. Sometimes clients change their minds on the day, sometimes logistics change, and sometimes you just want to get that shot that’ll blow everyone away. Not to mention the physicality involved in filming. Whatever the reason, it can be a very tough job. While we pride ourselves on process and mitigating these issues, you just can’t control everything.

When I was a one-man team, I could always take care of myself, but when working with others - you never know how it’s going to go. But Tim does his job every day without a single complaint. He understands what it takes to make great productions, he understands the unpredictability of it all, and he understands what it means to go above and beyond for the customer to give them something they’ll truly be happy with. He comes in with a positive attitude, never complains, and always gives it his best.

This may sound like a lot of employees or co-workers you know, but I tell you - when you’re factoring in the physicality of some of these long shoot days - it’s not always easy to keep that attitude up. But Tim does it every day he comes to work.

There are a lot of other amazing things I can say about Tim. His technical skills, when it comes to shooting, editing, grading, animating, and more, are incredible and his willingness to constantly improve always impresses me. But it is his attitude in the face of a tough job that has really made him stand out and what I appreciate most. He is a team player in every sense of the word and delivers truly amazing work.

Since hiring Tim, our video productions have been on a steady incline in scale and quality. When I look at the productions we do today compared to when we started - I’m incredibly proud of what we’ve accomplished. None of that would be possible without the skills, effort, and above all else, attitude that Tim Clark brings to BIteSite. Thank you, Tim, for being a part of our team.

Caseyli
Casey Li
CEO & Founder, BiteSite
3dwireframesaftereffects

Creating 3D line objects using After Effects and C4D lite

motion graphics after effects film

Creating true 3D objects inside After Effects became possible with the addition of the Cinema 4D Lite application. C4D Lite was added to the 2014.1 release of After Effects CC. With C4D lite being shipped along with AE, users who have never even considered working with a 3D program like C4D now have access to it. It's right there at your fingertips... you gotta check it out!

In one of BiteSite's recent projects, I was able to take advantage of the 3D capabilities C4D offers. In this post we'll focus on a unique look you can create inside AE with 3D objects from C4D. It's so simple and quick you may have already thought this up on your own! It's something that not only adds a new look, but may also add more functionality to your project. Check it out...

Apply these 2 effects (in this order) to the 3D layer inside AE:

  1. Find Edges --> for the look we're after, click the 'invert' option
  2. Unmult --> this is not an effect that comes with AE. It's free though and you can download it here: http://www.redgiant.com/downloads/legacy-versions/

What do these effects do?

  1. Find Edges --> It finds the edges... ;) Perhaps a little self-explanatory, perhaps not! Find edges looks at any shape, image, or object (whatever type of layer you apply it to) and recognizes all of the 'edges' in that layer. Edges are any part of the image where there is a significant transition. It then turns to white everything in the layer that is not an 'edge'. Checking off 'invert' on the effect turns everything to black rather than white.
  2. Unmult --> makes 100% black areas of an image completely transparent, and leaves 100% white areas completely opaque. Everything in between adjusts accordingly. Unmult is effectively creating an alpha channel for an image that doesn't actually have one. Awesome!

Apply these two effects, and you now have a 3D line object! You can choose to have it transparent or opaque (just toggle on/off the unmult effect).

No effects added:

Find Edges:

Find edges + Unmult:

This look can be great if, -- you want that sketched art look (try adding the 'turbulent displace' effect to further this look), -- you just want fresh and simple lines instead of heavy 3D objects, -- or even just for the added functionality you get by having your 3D objects transparent!

As well, try duplicating your 3D object layer and keep it placed directly above it's duplicate in the composition panel. Have one layer with the effects applied and one without!

Try it out! If you're reading this and you use this method, leave a comment below with a link to your video We'd love to see your work. Cheers :)

Tim

Timclark
Tim Clark
Filmmaker, BiteSite
Aeeditingmaskpaths

After Effects Editing Mask Path (moving individual points)

motion graphics after effects film

Alright, this was frustrating the hell out of me - especially considering most posts and forum responses had the right idea but were missing one key element.

The issue is in Adobe After Effects and Masks.

Here's the setup

  • You have some layer (shape, picture, footage, whatever)
  • You add a layer Mask
  • You edit the Mask over time by setting keyframes on the Mask Path property

The issue

Anytime you try to move a single point on the Mask Path - the entire mask path moves - regardless of if you have the Pen Tool or Selection Tool selected

So yes - most posts ands forum responses I've seen talk about - "Make sure you have the Pen Tool" selected - so that way you're in path editing mode and then you should be able to move the individual points. I tried ad nausea and I couldn't get this to work.

Solution

  • It all had to do with what was selected in the timeline. I had the Mask selected (that is, the Mask property that shows up when you twirl down the layer itself) - which is wrong. This was the issue.
  • Once I selected the layer itself and NOT the mask, I could then select the Pen Tool and edit the points individually. Kind of strange - but yeah - select the Layer and not its mask if you want to edit the Mask points individually. And yes - use the Pen Tool.

(note this is in Adobe After Effects CS6 - not sure about other versions).

Hope this helps out some peeps.

Caseyli
Casey Li
CEO & Founder, BiteSite